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Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyl Transferase, RBC

Item Value
Approval req'd? No
Available Stat? No
Test code G1PUT
Performed by Mayo
Sendout? Yes
Method Ultraviolet, kinetic
Patient Preparation The patient should not be transfused prior to obtaining samples. If transfused sampling should be delayed for at least 1 month to make sure the transfused cells have predominantly cleared and we are only testing the patient's own cells.
Collection Instructions Maintain sample at room temperature.
Container type Lavender top
Amount to Collect 5 mL blood
Sample type EDTA whole blood
Preferred volume 5 mL blood
Min. Volume 2 mL blood
Processing notes Transport sample refrigerated to CB. Order Mayo test code GALT.
Units U/g Hgb
Normal range > 18.4 U/g Hgb
Synonyms Phosphogalactose transferase; Gal-1-P uridyl transferase
Stability Room temperature 2 weeks, refrigerated 4 weeks
Turn around times 4-8 days
Additional information Galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder that results from a deficiency of 1 of the 3 enzymes catalyzing the conversion of galactose to glucose: galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), galactokinase (GALK), and uridine diphosphate galactose-4-epimerase (GALE). GALT deficiency is the most common cause of galactosemia and is often referred to as classic galactosemia. The complete or near-complete deficiency of GALT enzyme is life-threatening if left untreated. Complications in the neonatal period include failure to thrive, liver failure, sepsis, and death; even with survival, long-term intellectual disability can result. Galactosemia is treated by a galactose-restricted diet, which allows for rapid recovery from the acute symptoms and a generally good prognosis. Despite adequate treatment from an early age, individuals with galactosemia remain at increased risk for developmental delays, speech problems, and abnormalities of motor function. Females with galactosemia are at increased risk for premature ovarian failure. Based upon reports by newborn screening programs, the frequency of classic galactosemia in the United States is approximately 1 in 30,000, although literature reports range from 1 in 10,000 to 1 in 60,000 live births.

Galactose-1-phosphate (Gal-1-P) accumulates in the erythrocytes of patients with galactosemia. The quantitative measurement of Gal-1-P is useful for monitoring compliance with dietary therapy. Gal-1-P is thought to be the causative factor for development of liver disease in these patients and, because of this, patients should maintain low levels and be monitored on a regular basis.

Duarte-variant galactosemia (compound heterozygosity for the Duarte mutation, N314D, and a classic mutation) is generally associated with higher levels of enzyme activity (5%-20%) than classic galactosemia (<5%); however, this may be indistinguishable by newborn screening assays. Typically, individuals with Duarte-variant galactosemia have a milder phenotype, but are also often treated with a low galactose diet during infancy. The LA variant, which consists of N314D and a second mutation, L218L, is associated with higher levels of GALT enzyme activity than the Duarte-variant allele.

Newborn screening, which identifies potentially affected individuals by measuring total galactose (galactose and Gal-1-P) and/or determining the activity of the GALT enzyme, varies from state to state. The diagnosis of galactosemia is established by follow-up quantitative measurement of GALT enzyme activity. If enzyme levels are indicative of carrier or affected status, molecular testing for common GALT mutations may be performed. If 1 or both disease-causing mutations are not detected by targeted mutation analysis and biochemical testing has confirmed the diagnosis of galactosemia, sequencing of the GALT gene is available to identify private mutations.

The GALT gene maps to 9p13. Several disease-causing mutations are common in patients with classic galactosemia (G/G genotype). The most frequently observed is the Q188R classic mutation. This mutation accounts for 60% to 70% of classical galactosemia alleles. The S135L mutation is the most frequently observed mutation in African Americans and accounts for approximately 50% of the mutant alleles in this population. The K285N mutation is common in those of eastern European descent and accounts for 25% to 40% of the alleles in this population. The L195P mutation is observed in 5% to 7% of classical galactosemia. The Duarte mutation (N314D) is observed in 5% of the general US population.
CPT coding 82275-90
LOINC code 2314-3
Last Updated 3/7/2013 10:56:31 AM
Entry Number 412

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